Jun
4
6:30 pm18:30

Latinx Graduation Ceremony

  • Carl A. Fields Center Room 104

This event includes an address and a buffet dinner for students involved in the Princeton Latinx community and their families.  Prior registration is required.

Jun
4
5:00 pm17:00

Pan-African Graduation Ceremony

  • Richardson Auditorium

Participation in the ceremony is open to students whose identity is related to the Pan-African diaspora.  Guests of students and members of the University community are invited to attend. Intimate reception to follow.

Dear White People: Netflix Show Screening & Panel
Apr
28
6:00 pm18:00

Dear White People: Netflix Show Screening & Panel

  • Carl A. Fields Center Room 105

Join The Stripes, Princeton's  premier online and print publication dedicated to issues surrounding race, culture, and minority identity, for a screening of Netflix’s newest original series Dear White People. 

Food will be provided, and a panel discussion / Q&A session will follow the viewing of the first episode.

RSVP using this form

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Feel free to email us at tstripes@princeton.edu with any questions, comments or concerns.
We look forward to seeing you there!

From the classroom to the office: negotiation an Asian Pacific American identity beyond Princeton
Apr
18
6:00 pm18:00

From the classroom to the office: negotiation an Asian Pacific American identity beyond Princeton

  • Rocky PDR

A dinner talk with Professor Beth Lew-Williams of the History Department.

Beth Lew-Williams is a historian of race and migration in the United States, specializing in Asian American history. Her current project examines the role of Chinese migration and anti-Chinese violence in the making of modern U.S. border control. Her manuscript, The Chinese Must Go (under contract with Harvard University Press), offers a new history of Chinese Exclusion that maps the tangled relationships between local racial violence, federal immigration policy, and U.S. imperial ambitions in Asia.

Lew-Williams is also a contributor to the Chinese Railroad Workers in North American Project at Stanford University(link is external). This transnational collaborative effort seeks to give voice to the Chinese migrants who built the transcontinental railroad and transformed the U.S. West.

Lew-Williams earned her A.B. from Brown University and Ph.D. in history from Stanford University. She has held fellowships from the Harry Frank Guggenheim Foundation, Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, and the American Council of Learned Societies. Before coming to Princeton in 2014, she was an ACLS New Faculty Fellow at Northwestern University appointed in History and Asian American Studies.

Wellness Wednesday: Yoga and the Quest for Diversity and Equality
Apr
12
4:30 pm16:30

Wellness Wednesday: Yoga and the Quest for Diversity and Equality

  • Carl A. Fields Center MPR

A conversation with Dianne Bondy on yoga, mixed-race identities, and accessibility. Yoga class to follow (mats provided).

Together we will discuss how a spiritual practice created by a people of color became a commodity primarily practiced by a wealthy white population. When and how did a practice that is about unity become so exclusionary?  It's time to explore why diversifying attitudes around the yoga practice is key to including all bodies on the mat.

Dianne Bondy is a celebrated yoga teacher, social justice activist and leading voice of the Yoga For All movement. Her inclusive view of yoga asana and philosophy inspires and empowers thousands of followers around the world – regardless of their shape, size, ethnicity, or level of ability.

Dianne contributes to Yoga International, Do You Yoga, and Elephant Journal. She is featured and profiled in International media outlets: The Guardian, Huffington Post, Cosmopolitan, People and more. She is a spokesperson for diversity in yoga and yoga for larger bodies, as seen in her work with Pennington’s, Gaiam, and the Yoga & Body Image Coalition. Her work is published in the books: Yoga and Body Image, and Yes Yoga Has Curves.

BTGALA Spring Lecture featuring Leah Lakshmi Piepzna-Samarasinha on Disability Justice & Queer/Trans Liberation
Mar
30
7:30 pm19:30

BTGALA Spring Lecture featuring Leah Lakshmi Piepzna-Samarasinha on Disability Justice & Queer/Trans Liberation

  • Carl A. Fields Center MPR

A part of the BTGALA annual lecture series, this program will explore and interrogate the intersections of disability justice and queer and trans liberation. We will examine how centering disability justice in the work to organize around a/gender and a/sexuality is integral to the liberation of all. Copies of Leah’s books will be available for purchase from Labyrinth Bookstore at the event.

Leah Lakshmi Piepzna-Samarasinha is a queer femme sick and disabled Sri Lankan/ Irish/Roma writer and  performance artist The Lambda and Stonewall Award winning author of Dirty River, Bodymap, Love Cake, Consensual Genocide and co-editor of The Revolution Starts At Home, she is the co-founder of the QTPOC performance collective Mangos With Chili and a lead artist with disability justice performance collective Sins Invalid.

Sponsored by Princeton BTGALA with support from the LGBT Center, Women*s Center, Carl A. Fields Center, Office of Disability Services, AccessAbility Center and the Program in Gender and Sexuality Studies.

Wellness Wednesday: Woke Brown Girl with Prisca Dorcas Mojica Rodriguez
Mar
8
7:00 pm19:00

Wellness Wednesday: Woke Brown Girl with Prisca Dorcas Mojica Rodriguez

  • Carl A. Fields Center 1985 Meeting Room

Prisca Dorcas Mojica Rodríguez is the founder of Latina Rebels, a social media account for Latinas by Latinas focused on disrupting the binary expectations that are placed on Latina's bodies and minds. She is a writer for the Huffington Post, Philadelphia Printworks, Vivala, and Chica Magazine. Her writing often reflects on her experience as a "Brown girl" and the challenges she faced with identity, resistance, and self-love. 
Her empowering narratives are the core to the series of workshops she has conducted nationwide on how to survive white serving institutions as a woman of color. PULPO is pleased to feature her workshop at Princeton University on March 8, 2017.
A part of the Carl A. Fields Center for Equality and Cultural Understanding Wellness Wednesday series. 
This event is free and open to the public. RSVP HERE.
With support from the Carl A. Fields Center, Campus Conversations on Identities, and American Studies Program

Against Normalization: Intersectionality and Social Justice in the Age of Trump with Kimberle Crenshaw
Mar
2
4:30 pm16:30

Against Normalization: Intersectionality and Social Justice in the Age of Trump with Kimberle Crenshaw

  • 101 McCormick Hall

Kimberlé Crenshaw, Professor of Law at UCLA and Columbia Law School and Centennial Professor at the London School of Economics 2016-2018, is a leading scholar of Civil Rights, Black feminist legal theory, and race, racism and the law. A foundational activist and advocate in calling for a gender-inclusive approach to racial justice interventions, Crenshaw has worked extensively on violence against women, structural racial inequality, and affirmative action. Her groundbreaking work on “Intersectionality” has traveled globally and was influential in the drafting of the equality clause in the South African Constitution.

From Ferguson to Dallas to Charlotte: Racial Justice and Policing in America
Dec
9
8:30 am08:30

From Ferguson to Dallas to Charlotte: Racial Justice and Policing in America

  • Dodds Auditorium, Robertson Hall

“From Ferguson to Dallas to Charlotte: Racial Justice and Policing in America” will convene a diverse and distinguished panel to share their unique perspectives on the recent policing crises that have and continue to occur across the United States. More than two years after the shooting of Michael Brown in Ferguson, Missouri, the relationship between law enforcement and African American citizens remains one of the most important issues facing our country today.

This timely policy forum is designed to bring together prominent voices, with the goal of illuminating common ground and inspiring attendees to continue the conversation in their own communities. The discussion will challenge our collective and individual thinking — likely asking more questions than it will answer.

This event is co-sponsored by: the Woodrow Wilson School, Princeton University Women’s Center, Carl A. Fields Center for Equality + Cultural Understanding, Office of the Vice President for Campus Life, Department of Public Safety and the LGBT Center.

Register HERE

Poets Corner: Alex Dang
Dec
2
8:00 pm20:00

Poets Corner: Alex Dang

  • Carl Fields Center 105

Alex Dang started performing slam poetry at seventeen and hasn't slowed down since. Combining a firework performance style and intimate writing, Alex has earned his way to becoming the Eugene Poetry Grand Slam Champion in 2014 and 2015. He has been a TEDx speaker for both University of Oregon and Reno, Nevada, and his chapbook, 'You Can Do Better,' is published through Where Are You Press. His work has been featured on Huffington Post, UpWorthy, and Everyday Feminism and has been viewed over 1.5 million times on YouTube. Alex has performed in over 35 cities, 20 states, and is a world renowned burger expert.

Nov
30
12:30 pm12:30

Wellness Wednesday: Dealing with Trauma

  • Carl Fields Center 105

In a time of global precarity where violence is prevalent and many identities targeted, learning tools for self preservation is imperative to survival. The Fields Center and Dr. Nathalie Edmond from CPS have joined together to have intentional conversations on dealing with trauma and self care. Being proactive about learning skills and resources to deal with trauma is important since it can have severe consequences on a person's physical, spiritual and mental health.

Lunch will be provided

Wellness Wednesday: Cultural Thanksgiving
Nov
16
6:00 pm18:00

Wellness Wednesday: Cultural Thanksgiving

  • Carl Fields Center 104

In the spirit of community this event will be an opportunity for students of different backgrounds to join together in appreciation of one another. Recognizing the problematic and often untold history of Thanksgiving, this event will serve as a space where different cultures are centered and recognized. And of course, there will be an abundance of different food you won’t want to miss!

Poets Corner: El Grito De Poetas
Nov
11
8:00 pm20:00

Poets Corner: El Grito De Poetas

  • Carl Fields Center 105

El Grito de Poetas collective is a group of diverse Latinx poets dedicated to the craft and performance of modern day poetry. With their Latin roots and culture entrenched deeply within urban NYC, they are firmly committed to spreading knowledge of their various cultures, heritages and traditions through a neo-modern traditional style of spoken word.

Class Matters with Shane Lloyd
Nov
10
6:00 pm18:00

Class Matters with Shane Lloyd

  • Carl Fields Center 104

Shane Lloyd is an associate trainer with Class Action, which provides a dynamic framework and creates safe spaces for people from across the class spectrum to explore class and to identify and begin to dismantle classism. This workshop will ask students to interrogate the ways class impacts access and the experiences of their peers with a special emphasis on understanding systematic oppression, being self reflective and accountability.

Students RSVP

Staff/Faculty RSVP

The Department of African American Studies 2016-2017 Conversation Series
Oct
27
5:00 pm17:00

The Department of African American Studies 2016-2017 Conversation Series

  • Carl Fieds Center 104

A Conversation about Imagination and Black Lives

Four leading African American Studies scholars come together for what is sure to be an impassioned discussion about contemporary black issues, and an exploration of ideas of how African-American communities might reinvigorate democratic life in post-Obama America, with imagination and courage. 

Expect this conversation to explore black politics, state violence and poverty and various social movements. A Q&A will follow the conversation.

Books by all authors will be for sale before and after the event.

Marc Lamont Hill will sign copies of 'Nobody: Casualties of America’s War on the Vulnerable, from Ferguson to Flint and Beyond.'

Keeanga-Yamahtta Taylor will sign copies of 'From #BlackLivesMatter to Black Liberation.'

The Department of African American Studies will stream this conversation live at aas.princeton.edu.

More information on the event page

Wellness Wednesday: Study Break
Oct
26
6:00 pm18:00

Wellness Wednesday: Study Break

  • Carl Fields Center 105

With the stress of midterms lingering all over campus, a study break that embraces the child in you might be the perfect thing you need! Join the Fields Center in creating your very own slime, arts and crafts and frankenstein type teddy bears! Cut and sew teddies with unicorn wings and duck feet, color in a mandalas, and even take your slime home! Let’s not forget there will be food, music and lots of love.

A Conversation on Black Lives Matter with Dr. Keeanga-Yamahtta Taylor, Mike Brown, Sr. and Shaun King
Oct
18
6:00 pm18:00

A Conversation on Black Lives Matter with Dr. Keeanga-Yamahtta Taylor, Mike Brown, Sr. and Shaun King

  • Carl Fields Center 104

Join us for a poignant conversation about race, police brutality, violence and activism with Dr. Keeanga-Yamahtta Taylor, Michael Brown, Sr. and Shaun King. They invite us to hear the way the “personal is political” by providing personal testimony to the way racism has impacted a family as well as a growing national movement.

Dr. Keeanga-Yamahtta Taylor is author of From #BlackLivesMatter to Black Liberation and Professor in the Department of African American Students at Princeton University. Michael Brown, Sr. is the father of Michael Brown, the slain Missouri teenager who was killed by Ferguson police officer Darren Wilson following an altercation at a convenience store in the suburban St. Louis city in August 2014. Shaun King has written extensively about the Black Lives Matter movement, covering discrimination, police brutality, the prison industrial complex, and social justice in the wake of violence in New York, Baltimore, Cleveland, Ferguson, Missouri, Charleston, South Carolina, and other cities. He is Senior Justice Writer at the New York Daily News

Poets Corner: Nuyorican Poets Cafe
Oct
14
Oct 15

Poets Corner: Nuyorican Poets Cafe

  • Nuyorican Poets Cafe

Join the Fields Center as we takeover New York City and enjoy a night of poetry at one of the country’s most highly respected arts organizations, the Nuyorican Poets Cafe.

Over the last 40 years, the Nuyorican Poets Cafe has served as a home for groundbreaking works of poetry, music, theater and visual arts.The Cafe champions the use of poetry, jazz, theater, hip-hop and spoken word as means of social empowerment for minority and underprivileged artists. A multicultural and multi-arts institution, the Cafe gives voice to a diverse group of rising poets, actors, filmmakers and musicians who have not yet found consistent havens for their work.

More information to follow.

Wellness Wednesday: Sonya Renee - The Body is Not an Apology Workshop
Oct
12
8:00 pm20:00

Wellness Wednesday: Sonya Renee - The Body is Not an Apology Workshop

  • Carl Fields Center 105

This activity and participation based workshop uses popular education, performance poetry and media examples to introduce the concepts of Body Terrorism and Radical Self Love. Participants will explore how we are regularly asked to apologize for the bodies we inhabit (based on size, race, gender, sexuality or ability) and start to uncover their own road to Radical Self Love and body empowerment.

Sponsored by Women*s Center and Carl A. Fields Center for Equality and Cultural Understanding

Pton Latinos y Amigos General Members Meeting
Oct
9
4:00 pm16:00

Pton Latinos y Amigos General Members Meeting

  • Carl A. Fields Center for Equality and Cultural Understanding

PLA invites you to our second General Members meeting of the Fall 2016 semester! Whether you joined us last time or this is your first PLA event, we would love to meet you! 

We will be talking about our upcoming events, introducing the PLA executive board, selling Princeton Latinx/a/o t-shirts, speed-friending and enjoying some freshly-baked cookies :D OH, AND ANNOUNCING THE SPEAKER FOR THIS YEAR'S FALL GALA - this is an event that you don't want to miss out on! 

All Latinxs + amigxs are welcome, so come when you can and leave when you must!

Wellness Wednesday: La Bomba Dance
Oct
5
7:00 pm19:00

Wellness Wednesday: La Bomba Dance

  • Carl Fields Center 105

La Bomba, is a call and response musical expression and dance created in Puerto Rico by Afro-Latinx slaves and their ancestors on colonial sugar plantations along the coast of the island. It’s a unique style filled with deep cultural history. Yelimara Concepción Santos, a member of Afro-Inspira Bomba performance group, is a dance/movement therapist and performer that researches social, emotional, political, cultural and spiritual identities through song, dance, and music.

Workshop on the term "Latinx"
Oct
5
12:00 pm12:00

Workshop on the term "Latinx"

  • LGBT Center Rainbow Lounge , Room 247

This workshop will discuss the term “Latinx" and gender-inclusive language in the Latinx community. Please join us to learn the origins and usage of the term and ways you can be inclusive of non-binary Latinx. Lunch will be provided.

Jack Qu’emi is a nonbinary Boricua and transformational speaker and facilitator whose educational content addresses consent, the social constructs of gender/ biological sex, healthy relationships, safe(r) sex education, and LGBTQIPA+ inclusion and equity. They have been facilitating educational programming since 2011 and are known for injecting humor into heavily academic concepts while making them more accessible for all audiences. You can follow Jack on Twitter @jackquemi. 

Sponsored by the Princeton University Latinx Perspectives Organization (PULPO), Carl A. Fields Center, and LGBT Center

We Too Sing America
Oct
4
7:00 pm19:00

We Too Sing America

  • Carl Fields Center 104

Deepa Iyer, author of We Too Sing America: South Asian, Arab, Muslim and Sikh Immigrants Shape Our Multiracial Future, is a South Asian American activist, writer, and lawyer. In her compelling lecture Iyer asks how emerging communities of color and immigrants can transform America’s changing racial landscape. Iyer lifts up the stories of young South Asian, Muslim, Arab and Sikh activist who are supporting new movements of resistance. Through storytelling and policy analysis around racial flashpoints like the 2012 massacre at a Sikh gurdwara in Oak Creek and the opposition to the construction of the Islamic Center of Murfreesboro in post-9/11 America, Iyer challenges us to confront our national insecurities, anti-immigrant sentiment and racial anxiety on South Asian, Muslim, Arab and Sikh communities. 

Mad Women, Rump Shakers, and Bad Mamas
Sep
28
6:00 pm18:00

Mad Women, Rump Shakers, and Bad Mamas

  • Carl A. Fields Center 104

Tamara Winfrey-Harris, author of The Sisters are Alright: Changing the Broken Narrative of Black Women in America, uses humor, history and frank talk to reveal how stereotypes like Jezebel, Sapphire, Mammy and the Matriarch persist in the 21st century and how they influence the lives of Black women. 

An Evening with Mariachi El Bronx
Sep
26
8:00 pm20:00

An Evening with Mariachi El Bronx

  • Carl FIelds Center 104

Born out of a desire to challenge themselves musically, Mariachi El Bronx is the alter ego of Los Angeles punk band the Bronx. Conceived in 2006, the idea came about when the Bronx were asked to play an acoustic set and, rather than simply pare down their sound, they took their music in a whole new direction, moving away from hardcore and exploring Latin sounds. The band worked on material for the new project while the Bronx toured, and in 2009, Mariachi El Bronx released their eponymous debut. True to the form of their main gig, the bandmembers followed up with a second self-titled album in 2011. In 2014, the group returned with Mariachi El Bronx (III), which found them fusing synthesizers and electronics into their traditional mariachi sound.